Category Archives: Readings

Wild Writers Festival, 2018

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The New Quarterly
, a  literary magazine based at St Jerome’s at UWaterloo, is proud to present the seventh annual Wild Writers Literary Festival on November 2-4th, 2018. Join us for a celebration of the feral and free and its expression in poetry, the short story, and everything in between. Create, learn, discover and share the art of groundbreaking writing. There are workshops, readings, and food!

Friday the 2nd
Leading off Waterloo Region’s premier literary event will be Jael Richardson, an author and broadcaster, in conversation with Sharon Bala and Rawi Hage. This will take place at the CIGI Campus Auditorium on Erb Street West in Waterloo.

Sharon Bala won the 2017 Journey Prize, presented annually by McClelland and Stewart and the Writers’ Trust of Canada for the best short story published by an emerging writer in a Canadian literary magazine. Her story, “Butter Tea at Starbucks,” was published in The New Quarterly. Sharon’s bestselling debut novel, The Boat People, was a finalist for Canada Reads 2018 and the 2018 Amazon Canada First Novel Award.

Rawi Hage’s new novel, Beirut Hellfire Society, is a finalist for this year’s Governor General’s Literary Award and Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize. Hage’s debut novel, De Niro’s Game (2006), won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and was shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Award for English fiction. His second novel, Cockroach (2008), was shortlisted for the Giller, the Governor General’s and the Rogers Fiction Prize.

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Saturday the 3rd

…also at CIGI, there’ll be an intriguing mix of writer’s craft classes, panel discussions and masterclasses. These classes will include instruction on writing poetry, creative nonfiction, character development as well as custom crafted ones for young creators and caregivers.

Sunday the 4th
A literary brunch featuring conversations with and readings from Katherine Ashenburg, Claire Cameron and Michael Redhill at the Rhapsody Barrel Bar on King Street in Kitchener.

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Katherine Ashenburg is the prize-winning author of three nonfiction books: Going to Town: Architectural Walking Tours in Southern Ontario, The Mourner’s Dance: What We Do When People Die, and The Dirt on Clean: An Unsanitized History.

Claire Cameron has written three novels: The Last Neanderthal, which won the 2018 Evergreen Award; The Bear, longlisted for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction (formerly the Orange Prize); and The Line Painter, nominated for the Arthur Ellis Crime Writing Award for best first novel.

Michael Redhill is a Giller Prize-winning novelist, poet and playwright. He is the author of the novels Consolation, longlisted for Man Booker Prize; Martin Sloane, a finalist for the Giller Prize; and most recently, Bellevue Square, winner of the 2017 Giller Prize.

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St. Jerome’s Reading Series, 2018-2019

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Once again, it’s time to announce the St. Jerome’s Reading Series, here at University of Waterloo. The first event is a reading by poet Julie Cameron Gray (pictured above), on Friday, 19 October, 4:30pm, in SJ1 3027. Gray’s most recent collection, Lady Crawford, was shortlisted for the League of Canadian Poets’ 2017 Pat Lowther Award (and was reviewed by Lena Dunham in Lenny). Information about other readings follows–from Canadian football to Lucy Maud Montgomery, this year’s series has it all!

Jael Richardson, Friday 16 November, 4:30pm, SJ1 3027

Richard Cumyn, Friday 1 February, 4:30pm, SJ1 3027

Melanie Fishbane, Friday 8 March, 4:30pm, SJ1 3027

The readings are free and all are welcome. Hope to see you there — and please spread the word

We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country.

 

 

Dr. Tolmie & The Art of Dying

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The Reading Series at St Jerome’s has an exciting bonus extra reading this term!

Dr. Sarah Tolmie of UWaterloo’s English Department will be reading for us, to celebrate the release of her new book, The Art of Dying.

Please join us Friday 23 March at 4:30 in SJ1 3027.

The reading is free and all are welcome. Please spread the word!

Sarah Tolmie is the author of the speculative fictions Two Travelers, NoFood and The Stone Boatmen, all published by Aqueduct Press to starred reviews in Publishers Weekly. Her first volume of poetry, Trio, was shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Award in 2016. Her second book of poems, The Art of Dying, has just been released by MQUP in 2018. A lifelong Le Guin fan, her elegy Ursula in The Underworld will appear in the forthcoming issue of On Spec. She teaches British literature and creative writing at UW as an Associate Professor.

Please visit us at http://canlitkicksass.blogspot.ca

Poetry and Complexity Event

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What do the following three people have in common?

Madhur Anand, Waterloo Institute for Complexity & Innovation (WICI) Director, theoretical ecologist, and poet

Roald Hoffman, Nobel Prize-winning theoretical chemist and poet

Rae Armantrout, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and Guggenheim Fellow

They are all participating in the event Poetry & Complexity, Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at the University of Waterloo Davis Centre, Room 1301, from 4pm-5pm, with a cocktail reception to follow from 5pm-6pm (complimentary hors d’oeuvres and cash bar). The event will be moderated by English’s Dr. Sarah Tolmie.

Please RSVP to: n3hakim@uwaterloo.ca

Bakelite & the end of the world: A Reading


Friday, February 2nd: why not venture over to St. Jerome’s (SJ1 3027) for a reading by fiction writer, poet, and dramatist Kate Cayley at 4:30pm? Her first collection of short fiction, How You Were Born, won the Trillium Book Award and was a finalist for the Governor General’s Award. Her first collection of poetry, When This World Comes to an End, was shortlisted for the ReLit Award. Her second collection of poetry, Other Houses, was recently published by Brick Books. She was a playwright-in-residence at Tarragon Theatre from 2009-2017, and wrote two plays for Tarragon, After Akhmatova and The Bakelite Masterpiece, which had its American premiere in 2016 and will be produced again at the New Repertory Theater in Boston this spring. She is currently working on This Is Nowhere, commissioned by Zuppa Theatre, and her first novel.

The opening act will be Tina Blair Fang. The readings are free and all are welcome. Please spread the word!

Not pulling punches: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

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Maybe you’ve managed to remain unaware of the scandals plaguing Canadian Literature over the last year. We should be grateful that, in the midst of all the chaos, there are people who have made sense of it for the uninitiated, mounting sharp and insightful critiques. This includes Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm, author of the Globe and Mail essay “The cultural appropriation debate is over. It’s time for action.” Akiwenzie-Damm is an Anishinaabe writer, poet, editor, and the founder and managing editor of Kegedonce Press, an Indigenous publisher based in the territory of her people, the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation, Saugeen Ojibway Nation in southwestern Ontario. And she will be speaking at UWaterloo on Thursday, January 18th, 4pm-5:30 in the Modern Languages Theatre of the Arts, as part of the Indigenous Speakers Series.

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Akiwenzie-Damm’s recent book, The Stone Collection, received a starred review from Publishers Weekly and was a finalist for a Sarton Literary Award. As the publisher writes: “Through unforgettable characters, these stories—about love and lust, suicide and survival, illness and wholeness—illuminate the strange workings of the human heart.” Eden Robinson concurs: “Generous, funny and dark, The Stone Collection doesn’t pull its emotional punches but it leavens its grim truths with bright humour and earthy lust. Akiwenzie-Damm’s writing shape-shifts and mesmerizes in short stories that tell us no matter how hard the journey, love can heal us all.”

The Indigenous Speakers Series is co-sponsored by the Waterloo Aboriginal Education Centre and the Faculty of Arts. The series highlights the voices of Indigenous artists, writers, activists, and leaders from across Turtle Island, offering UWaterloo students, faculty and staff opportunities to learn from, understand, and engage with Indigenous issues.

Image: from a CBC interview with author–well worth reading here.

Today: flip a coin–and follow CBC’s advice

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Colloquium or reading? Colloquium or reading? Colloquium or reading? Or… both?! CBC has strong feelings about how you should spend today at Waterloo!

Late morning, you could attend with the second CTE Teaching Colloquium featuring English and Philosophy grad students, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in HH 373. You are welcome to bring your lunch, in case you get hungry listening to:

  • Maša Torbica, “The Classroom as Territory: (Re)Negotiating a Decolonizing Pedagogical Praxis”
  • Teresa Branch-Smith, “Creating Inclusive Classrooms amidst Discriminatory Content”
  • Meghan Riley, “Women’s and Gender Studies Across the Curriculum”

Abstracts for the presentations can be found on Colloquium’s events page.

Later in the day, there’s a reading by Mariam Pirbhai on Friday 12 January at 4:30pm in SJ1 3027 (St Jerome’s at the University of Waterloo). Mariam Pirbhai is the author of a debut short story collection titled Outside People and Other Stories (Inanna 2017), praised by award-winning novelist Shani Mootoo for its “clear-eyed compassion, generosity and literary brilliance.” And it was just ranked #6 in CBC’s Top 95 Must Read recommended books of 2017!