Category Archives: Graduate students

Music and the Road with faculty and grad students

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The UWaterloo Bookstore has a shelf dedicated to faculty authors: eight of the twenty-four books currently on display are by English faculty. If they want to give us a full third of the display (!), they might order in Dr. Gordon E. Slethaug‘s Music and The Road: Essays on the Interplay of Music and Popular Culture of the American Road (Bloomsbury, 2017). Dr. Slethaug is both editor and contributor. Other UWaterloo English contributors include Dr. Chad Wriglesworth and PhD students Virginia Shay and Evelyn DeShane.

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An Alumnus’s book on the Stratford Festival

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You may UWaterloo English alumnus Shawn DeSouza-Coelho (MA 2015) from a previous Words in Place post, part of our “Week in the Life of a Graduate Student” series. Now he has a book coming out, Whenever You’re Ready, available for pre-order from ECW Press. As the press writes:

Whenever You’re Ready is an intimate account of the career of Nora Polley, who — in her 52 years at the Stratford Festival — has learned from, worked with, and cared for some of the greatest directors, actors, stage managers, and productions in Canadian theatrical history. In so doing, Nora became one of the greatest stage managers this country has ever seen. Here is an account of the Stratford Festival’s history like no other. From her childhood forays into a theater her father, Victor, worked tirelessly to help maintain, to her unexpected apprenticeship and the equally unexpected 40 years of stage management it ushered in, this is the Stratford Festival seen exclusively through Nora’s eyes. Here is an immersive account of a life spent in service of the theater, told from the ground floor: where actors struggle with lines and anxieties, where directors lose themselves in the work, where the next season is always uncertain, and where Nora — a stage manager, a custodian, a confidante, a pillar, a rock — finds her rhythm, her patience, her perseverance, her love, her consistency, and her invisibility. These are the qualities that make a stage manager great and, whenever you’re ready, this book will show you why.

PhD student oversees literary prize

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UWaterloo English PhD candidate Doug Sikkema has spent part of the last two years overseeing the new Ross and Davis Mitchell Prize for Faith in Writing ($25,000), an initiative of Cardus, a Christian think tank–though the contest was open to individuals of any faith. Among the jurors was UWaterloo alumnus–and Parliamentary Poet Laureate–George Elliott Clarke.  Last evening, at the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto, the winners were announced: Rowda Mohamud (poetry; pictured above) and Brandon Trotter (fiction). For more about the contest and the short list, you can visit their website.

Image credit: muslimlink.camuslimlink.ca

UW English at the Wild Writers Festival

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As you might know from previous posts, the Wild Writers Festival is coming up, and UWaterloo English is participating. There is a Young Creators Masterclass (for writers aged 13-17) with Carrie Snyder, a Governor-General’s Award Fiction finalist and lecturer in UW English, on November 4th. That same day, Masa Torbica, a PhD student in English at UWaterloo, will be a member of the panel on Displacement Narratives which is moderated by Dr. Lamees Al Ethari of our department. From the program:

 

“From immigrant and refugee narratives to suppressed voices from Indigenous communities, the concept of displacement has incited discussions on migrations, lost homelands, and new ideas of belonging and identity. Meet writers who are finding a language to express their experiences, and who are leading the way, showing how to engage in conversation.”

Full STEAM ahead for English students

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Maybe you have encountered the acronym STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) but haven’t yet run up against STEAM. Arts is the A, and in this guest post from undergraduate English student Tyler Black we learn all about a special STEAM initiative developed by English alumni, faculty, and students. Thank you to Tyler and all who participated!

“60 Minutes to Save the World” as the STEAM rises
By: Tyler Black – 4th Year English, RMPC

It all began as the brainchild of the English Department’s Advisory Council Chair, Mandy Lam (OpenText). The English Advisory Council is a group of alumni and friends of English who hold positions in several sectors and consult with the department to provide guidance about the future of literary and rhetorical studies in the department. Lam worked with the council’s Vice Chair Ricardo Olenewa (Google) and faculty liaison, Prof. Ashley Mehlenbacher, to plan a workshop for the 2017 Canadian Student Leadership Conference.

Prof. Mehlenbacher recently won an Early Researcher Award from the Ministry of Research, Innovation, and Science, and this opportunity to develop a workshop for CSLC dovetailed nicely with her research on multidisciplinary teams and education. Students from Prof. Mehlenbacher’s Qualitative Methods in Prof. Comm. & UX Research graduate seminar soon joined the team (Justine Fifield, Julie Funk, Stephanie Honour, Salman Jivani, Lindsay Meaning, Aliaa Sidawi, Kari Stewart), along with several research assistants (Tyler Black, Sara Majid, Shawn Corsetti, Zainab Salman, Devon Moriarty, Shania Trepanier), and set off to design a youth outreach workshop.

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The Qualitative Methods in Professional Communication and User Experience Research class at Google KW for the design sprint.

Ricardo’s words about the half day ‘design sprint,’ hosted at the Google Kitchener-Waterloo Office (pictured above), echoed into the very heart of the workshop the team was to create: “[A]ctivities like this session normalize the idea that both the University and industry are stronger when we collaborate. The EAC is critical because they create opportunities for that collaboration.” With this belief in mind, the team set forth to create a workshop that balanced education, innovation, and multidisciplinary thinking. The result: “60 Minutes to Save the World.”

Fast-forward four months and all the gears are in place and the STEAM machine is ready to be turned on. The workshop title: “60 Minutes to Save the World,” represents what the workshop was designed to do. The team put together a three station workshop to draw on the innovative minds of the attending high school students to utilize both Arts and STEM knowledge, as well as technology relevant to various industries, to solve environmental and social crises.

The event took place at the Games Institute and consisted of three stations. One of which, the team designed for students to create their own augmented reality experience. This creation as well as those from the other stations contributed to an Impact Wall representing the breadth of knowledge and the broad ranging ideas the students used to solve the posed problems.

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One station utilizing LED lights and batteries to encourage a creative take on scientific practice.

For more coverage of the event, check out the Daily Bulletin article as well as the Faculty of Arts and the Games Institute, who will be providing coverage via their faculty pages and social media.

Addendum from Dr. Ashley Mehlenbacher: Tyler, who wrote this post, also deserves special credit for pulling all of this together and ensuring we ran a flawless event at the CSLC. Tyler’s outstanding work included planning and running practice workshops to ensure timing was spot on, and also troubleshooting the day of the event. All of this complemented the impressive work the rest of the team put in throughout the design process.

Photo Credits: Megan Hood, Devon Moriarty

UWaterloo Writing Contest

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The contest is open to all Waterloo students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

As part of the commitment to the UN Women’s HeForShe IMPACT 10x10x10 initiative, the University of Waterloo presents the Second Annual HeForShe Writing Contest, launching September 2017.

Gender equity calls for all of our voices and all of our stories. To achieve lasting change, we must connect experiences of gender to a diverse understanding of equity in the Waterloo community and in our world. Everyone in the University of Waterloo community — students, staff, faculty, and alumni — are invited to share their stories, real and imagined, about building a better and more equitable world.

The 2017-18 contest theme is INTERSECTIONS. Participants are asked to consider how gender equity fits into the larger equity story. Where are the overlaps and connections between gender and race, ethnicity, age, ability, class, faith, and/or sexuality? How do the perspectives of gender equity connect to the goal of equality for all people? Can working towards gender equity help to advance equity conversations more broadly?

Through poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction, we welcome your reflections on the past and your hopes, dreams, and directions for the future. When gender equity is connected to the dream of equality for everyone, how is our world made better? Your stories are a part of the Waterloo landscape — today and tomorrow. In what ways are you #HeForShe?

A $500 prize will be awarded for the top submission in each category (poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction). Selected submissions will also be included in a special University of Waterloo anthology on gender equity that will be published on March 8, 2018 — International Women’s Day. Submissions must not have been previously published. Pieces submitted as part of Waterloo course work will be accepted.

Submissions are due October 27, 2017. For more information see the website.

Image source: BC’s 5to9Woodwork.

Game Jam!

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The UWaterloo Games Institute, led by English’s Dr. Neil Randall, is hosting a Game Jam, Friday, 29 September 2017 at 4:30 PM – Sunday, 1 October 2017 at 7:00 PM .

This event is an opportunity to make games, explore new game ideas, and interact with fellow game-lovers in an exciting and relaxed environment. Learn something, teach something, make something, and play something!

The Fall 2017 Jam welcomes special guests presenting a Unity 101 tutorial, Google’s Firebase games team, and St Paul’s Greenhouse social impact incubator.

The event is a community-based effort to increase the total knowledge, experience, and ideas available to community members. Do you know something about games that may interest others? Then volunteer! We want to know what you know!

  • LEARN: you can hear talks from invited experts about the tools and techniques involved in the design and creation of games.
  • MAKE: you can try your hand at building your own games from scratch along with helpful advice and guidance from our GI mentors.
  • PLAY: You can explore new kinds of games, try out some of the brand-new games that were made at the G.I. Jam itself, and give/receive feedback on yours and others’ creations!

Bring: Your own laptop, any supplies you might need  — construction paper and markers provided in limited supply.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Tickets are $15 and purchased online via Shopify HERE. Please note that both the online payment form AND this Eventbrite guest registration is necessary to attend this event. The cost of your ticket gives you access to the event, lunch on both days, and use of our equipment throughout the weekend.

 

FAQ:

Q: Where can I find more details and FAQs?

A: Please visit our website! https://uwaterloo.ca/games-institute/uwgame-jam  

Q: Where can I contact the organizer with any questions?

A: The GI Jam organizers can be reached via the email: games.institute@uwaterloo.ca

Q: Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?

A: You do not need to bring your printed Eventbrite ticket, but you should bring a piece of ID. Not only do we use it to double-check registrations, we trade you for your ID if/when you borrow our development equipment. Please make sure to have proof-of-payment available on your phone or printed out, especially if paying within a few hours of the event.

 

Tentative Schedule (all in QNC 1502 unless otherwise noted):

Friday (the 29th):

  • 4:30 pm – Doors open  / Registration begins. During this time, teams can form, chat, and brainstorm before things kick off.
  • 5:00 pm – Opening remarks + theme reveal!
  • 5:30 pm – Tutorials/talks begin (Unity 101, Firebase games team from Google, St Paul’s Greenhouse social impact incubator). Quiet space is available in QNC 2502.
  • 9:30 pm – Doors close

Saturday (the 30th):

  • 9:00 am – Doors open
  • 9:30 am – Welcome back, reminder of available help.
  • 12:00 pm – Lunch begins
  • 2:30 pm – Check-in, mentors circulate
  • 5:00 pm – Show & tell (optional but highly encouraged: 2 minutes for each team to describe what they’re making)
  • 9:30 pm – Doors close

Sunday (the 1st):

  • 9:00 am – Doors open
  • 5:00 pm – Showcase/Jam awards
  • 6:00 pm – Closing
  • ~7pm – Join us for an after party at the Watchtower restaurant (280 Lester St, Unit #105) after the showcase!