Category Archives: Co-op

Alumna Cherie Chevalier on Why Arts

Screenshot 2019-04-22 20.29.24
Did you know Cherie Chevalier, worldwide sales leader for marketing solutions at Microsoft, is also a UWaterloo English, Rhetoric, and Professional Writing alumna? Chevalier was recently interviewed for the Macleans article “Yes, you will get a job with that arts degree” addressing the desire for Arts graduates in industry. From the article:

In her industry, says Chevalier, “things move so quickly and the pace of innovation is so high that we need people who can think critically, react, solve problems and have that high level of intelligent agility and adaptability that will enable them to be successful in any role.” She says she looks for candidates who “can work with each other across groups and divisions . . . and are able to see things from other people’s perspective and who are able to communicate clearly and build relationships.” By those criteria, “liberal arts graduates are particularly well-positioned.”

For more see: Yes, you will get a job with that arts degree.”

 

Advertisements

Awards for Students!!!

 

awardI love this part of the year, where we celebrate our students. And of course, this is just the tip of the iceberg–there are so many wonderful students not named here. Thank you to everyone who participated, with especial thanks to Dr. John Savarese and Dr. Andrea Jonahs for coordinating, with the support of the staff in English to whom we are all, always, indebted. Read on to see who won what!

Undergraduate Academic Awards

English Society Creative Writing Award for Poetry: Joanna Laurie Dixon Cleary

Rhetoric and Digital Design Award: Neha Ravella

rpw
Rhetoric and Professional Writing Award: Sara Akbarzadeh-Zahraia Kohan, Aarjan Giri, and Dylan Yip-Chuck

Andrew James Dugan Prize in Rhetoric and Professional Writing: Eden McFarlane

Award in American Literature and Culture: Emily Pass

Canadian Literature Prize: Dinah Shi

Walter R. Martin English 251 Award: Abigail Hamann

trenton
Diaspora and Transnational Studies Prize: Trenton McNulty

Andrew James Dugan Prize in Literature: Judith Blasutti

The Hibbard Prize for Shakespeare Studies: Selin Elyay

Masternak Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship in English: Joanna Laurie Dixon Cleary and Hanna Colbert

English Society Creative Writing Award for Prose: Xin Niu Zhang

Albert Shaw Poetry Prize: Xin Niu Zhang

Graduate Academic Awards

Beltz Essay Prize, MA: Renée Belliveau

Beltz Essay Prize, PhD: Christopher Cameron (Honourable Mention: Lindsay Meaning)

Rhetoric Essay Prize, MA: Robyn Peers

Rhetoric Essay Prize, PhD: Devon Moriarty

Graduate Creative Writing Award: Hannah Watts and Evelyn Deshane

gradprof
Graduate Professional Communication Award: Devon Moriarty, Lillian Black, and Danielle Griffin

David Nimmo English Graduate Scholarship: Ashley Irwin

Jack Gray Fellowship: Christin Taylor

W.K. Thomas Graduate Scholarship: Ashley Irwin

Co-op Awards

Undergraduate Co-op Work Report Award: Veronika Mikolajewski

Graduate Co-op Work Report Award: Andrew Myles

Teaching and Professionalization Awards

TA Award for Excellence in Teaching: Hannah Watts

Independent Graduate Instructor Award for Excellence in Teaching: Meghan Riley

imj
Lea Vogel-Nimmo Graduate Professionalization Scholarship: Ian Gibson and Jin Sol Kim

More on our awards–including additional photos!–have been posted by Dr. Bruce Dadey on the UWaterloo English Department site.

Alumna Sara Kannan: Making a Difference

sarakannan

There are some students whose names you hear over and over, even if you’ve never taught them: Sara Kannan is one of those students. Read on to find out why we all know of her, how she made her co-op degree work for her, and how she is giving back to the department. Thank you to Sara for participating in Words in Place! –JLH


JLH: What made you decide to attend UWaterloo?
SK: It’s actually a pretty great story – I was born in Canada but moved to the U.S. as a child and grew up just outside of Washington, D.C. During Grade 12, I focused on applying to U.S. universities in the northeast so that I could be between my parents and my maternal grandparents in Waterloo, who I’m very close with. I never considered applying to university in Canada because I did all my schooling in the U.S., from Grades 1 to 12, and because all of my friends were also going to university in the same area. During spring break, I visited my first choice school in New York (on the way to Waterloo) and found that it wasn’t what I expected. We finished the week by visiting my grandparents in Waterloo, who immigrated to Canada in the 1960s because my grandfather was offered a professorship in the Pure Mathematics Department at UWaterloo. With my grandfather as a professor emeritus and all five of his children (including my mom) as UWaterloo alumni, I was persuaded to at least visit UWaterloo before ruling it out. I went on a campus tour and immediately fell in love – I was so sure that I wanted to attend UWaterloo that I actually declined all my acceptance offers to U.S. universities before applying to UWaterloo!

JLH: How important was the co-op stream to you in thinking about your potential future career?
SK: Co-op was essential to my career path. I initially applied to the co-op stream with the comfort of knowing that I could always change my mind later, but ended up completing four co-op terms. The skills and experience I gained in going through the job application process and working in a professional setting were invaluable and highly transferable. Additionally, I was able to try out several different jobs to find what I liked and what wasn’t a good fit for me, which helped me focus my efforts when applying for a full-time job post-graduation. Having about 1.5 years of full-time, professional experience in various jobs related to my degree (before I even graduated!) was absolutely necessary to finding a job in the “real world.”

JLH: Some people will know your name from our posts on awards ceremonies: you received numerous awards from the English department, including the Albert Shaw Poetry Prize, Rhetoric and Professional Writing Award, English Society Creative Writing Award for Prose, Quarry Integrated Communication Co-op Award, and others. Can you talk a bit about how those were important to you?
SK: Honestly, winning those awards meant the world to me. To receive tangible evidence in recognition of my writing abilities, from my professors and in front of my peers, really validated my confidence in my skills and the worth of my degree. I’ve known that I would be a writer since I was 6 years old, but not everyone has been supportive or encouraging. Winning these awards almost every year felt like proof that my lifelong dreams could become reality – some of them, at least (I don’t think that I’ll end up a princess, but hey, it happened to Meghan Markle!).

JLH: Fewer people might know that you decided to fund an award, and quite soon after graduating. What made this a logical choice to you?
SK: I became very passionate about postcolonialism during my time at UWaterloo, taking postcolonial literature classes and bringing postcolonialism into traditional literature/rhetoric classes. I started writing about things like magical realism as a method of resistance in understanding the Haitian Revolution or the Dreaming as a way for Aboriginal Australians to displace colonizers, but quickly noticed that my essays didn’t fit into any of the existing awards categories and couldn’t be submitted. Since winning awards was very important to me personally and professionally as an undergraduate student, I wanted to give back to the English Department and future students by filling the void.

Once I was no longer eligible to receive awards and in a position to pay it forward, I collaborated with the English Department and Sherri Sutherland from Arts Advancement to establish and sponsor the annual Diaspora and Transnational Studies Prize. To me, the significance of this award lies in recognizing the importance, relevance, and pervasiveness of diaspora, transnational, and postcolonial topics – topics that are increasingly acknowledged, studied, and explored through a variety of methods and mediums, in an effort to understand our world and the people in it. My goal was to make the award as inclusive as possible to reflect the nature of postcolonial studies, opening submissions to essays and projects submitted by any student or professor, as long as it is related to postcolonial studies (which can be very broadly interpreted).

JLH: If you were to imagine your dream course in postcolonial literature, what texts would be on it?
SK: That’s a really difficult question, because so many texts (not just literature!) can be interpreted as postcolonial. I think the three most important books to establish the framework of postcolonialism as a literary theory are Orientalism by Edward Said (who is considered the founder of postcolonial studies); The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literature by Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin; and Decolonizing the Mind by Ngugi wa Thiong’o. From the classes that I took at UWaterloo, my favourite texts to analyze were Frida Kahlo’s paintings, Nervous Conditions by Tsitsi Dangarembga, and Spanish flamenco music.

At its heart, postcolonialism is about intersectionality (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, socioeconomic status, religion, etc.) through the lens of historical imperial-colonial power struggles. Almost any text post-contact can be analyzed for these influences – I challenge everyone to find the postcolonial in their favourite text!

 

Award for undergrad Danielle Bisnar Griffin

Screenshot 2018-11-08 13.49.31
Congratulations to UWaterloo English undergraduate Danielle Bisnar Griffin, winner of the DiMarco Undergraduate Scholarship in Computational Rhetoric. This is not her first award from UWaterloo; she previously received the Quarry Integrated Communication Co-op English Award for her report ”Comparative Data Visualizations of Textual Features in the OED and the Life of Words Genre 3.0 Tagging System,” which addressed the work completed during a co-op semester. Danielle was kind enough to share with us a bit about what made her application stand out:

I received the award for my enthusiasm for computational rhetoric, evidenced by my participation in Dr. David Williams’ project The Life of Words and the research interests I developed due to working there. During my time at The Life of Words, I have completed co-op reports that examine the rhetoric of genre using computational methods and I have pursued these interests towards a senior honors essay, scheduled for completion March 2019. I have also consistently committed to improving my computational skills by attending conference skills workshops throughout my undergrad. Finally, I have also been working with Dr. Randy Harris and Dr. DiMarco’s Rhetorical Figures team, in which we work to develop an ontology of rhetorical figures. This is inherently very computational.

Thank you to Danielle for participating in Words in Place, and to alumnus Sam Pasupalak (BCS ’12) for funding the award.–JLH

Rating co-op and more: Alumna Sarah MacKeil

Screenshot 2017-09-20 16.26.21
Every so often I mention who is up next on the department blog, instigating mass enthusiasm about the individual. Sarah MacKeil is one of those students–her former instructors are uniformly positive. Now you can find out why!–JLH

JLH: How did you decide on UWaterloo and your program of study?
SM: Back in grade twelve, I felt pulled in so many different directions. I especially loved writing and international development; UWaterloo let me study both. While I didn’t end up pursuing the INDEV minor, I loved the freedom to choose courses from different programs or faculties. I also ended up with an Applied Language Studies minor and a term abroad. For me, flexibility was a more exciting fit than a strictly specialized degree.

Gaining co-op experience as an English major was also appealing.

JLH: What are your most memorable moments from English?
SM: I really enjoyed the rhetoric courses. One of my favourite courses was Language and Politics (ENGL 407). It was a fourth-year seminar that was surprisingly interactive. We studied texts and discussed case studies on a variety of topics, including digital ethics, creative cities and climate literature. There was a lot of camaraderie, and I think the active discussion helped with learning.

I also have fond memories of Criticism II (ENGL 251B). For whatever reason, its giant textbook put me in touch with my inner English geek. Sometimes people don’t connect with theory-based courses, but it felt like each lecture we got to explore a different way of looking at the world.

JLH: You did the co-op stream: do you feel it was a good fit for you? Did you ever find it overwhelming? In the end how would you rate the experience?
SM: Co-op was one of my favourite parts of my degree, and I would rate it highly: let’s say 9/10. I like how it provides the opportunity to try diverse experiences. I worked with small and large tech companies, the federal government, a law firm, and a small NGO in Germany.

It works well both ways: if you love your job, you can pursue similar roles in the future. If you realize you’re not well-suited to certain environments or types of work, it’s frustrating, yet you still develop skills and are only committed for four months. Moving so frequently is not for everyone, but I find most students get in the groove and appreciate the alternation between school and work.

I’m not a fan of unfair stereotypes about English majors being less employable, and it feels good to graduate with 20 months of relevant full-time experience.

JLH: You were part of a team that received a MESBURG Marketing Planning Award. Can you tell us a bit about that, and what it was like to work across disciplines?
SM: That was a great team experience. It was a term-long project where we had to innovate on an existing company’s offerings (our company was Indigo) and present a marketing plan.

It’s always encouraging to work with passionate people, and as cliché as it sounds, it is beneficial to pool diverse strengths. For instance, one of my teammates contributed some great statistical analysis. We all worked hard, and collaboration enabled us to have a broader perspective.

Marketing (ECON 344) was also my favourite business course, partly because its relevance to my field. Some courses felt less applicable, but they were part of the overall package.

JLH: Now that you’re done your degree, what are you doing next year?
SM: This fall, I’m moving to France to work as an English teaching assistant with the TAPIF program. I find language acquisition fascinating and had a positive experience in Germany last year, so I’m looking forward to teaching in a new cultural context. I’m also going to make a valiant effort at starting a blog. (Optimist in Motion)

Beyond that, I’m thinking of exploring applied linguistics or getting more experience in communications. We’ll see!

All about Alumna Rupi Kaur

A new video about best-selling UWaterloo English alumna Rupi Kaur. For more on Rupi, co-op, and her degree, click here. Maybe you might be interested in taking a writing course? Creative Writing 1 (ENGL 335) is offered Spring 2017.

Amy, English, and Co-op at Microsoft

Screenshot 2017-03-10 13.06.46
UWaterloo Arts Stories has profiled Amy, a fourth year Honours Arts and Business Co-op with a double major in English and Economics: “Amy’s last co-op placement was at Microsoft as a Marketing Associate for small and medium businesses. At Microsoft, she focused on marketing specific campaigns and worked on email newsletters and in-store events. At her last co-op placement, Amy was able to see how her work had an impact at the workplace.” You can read more at Arts Undergraduate Stories.